the-real-jeff:

Never forget the REAL skeleton war

image

(via pocketwatchpal)


vinegod:

Kids and their life goals these days… by SeanTheGod


basedgosh:

not sure what it is about tiny bows on bras and underwear but theyre neat as hell

(via dutchster)



ruebird:

warm-up sketches of the link bias! click for fullview ok.

i can’t decide if i like him most with short hair or a ponytail :’I

(via princessbubblgum)


REBLOG IF YOU WILL NOT LEAVE THE FANDOM EVEN WHEN THE SHOW IS OVER

korranation:

4LYFE


korranation:

So many feels in that first Book 4 clip


fashionsfromhistory:

La Capresses des Colonies
Charles-Henri-Joseph Cordier
1861

In his unpublished memoirs Charles Cordier cites the law of April 27, 1848 that abolished slavery in France and its colonies, writing: “My art incorporated the reality of a whole new subject, the revolt against slavery and the birth of anthropology.” In pioneering ethnography as a subject for sculpture in the nineteenth century, Cordier aimed to illustrate what he described as “the idea of the universality of beauty.” His busts often paired couples of the opposite sex but of the same race. This rare instance of matched busts of women was desired by the purchaser, a gaming club in Marseilles, that also commissioned the sumptuous Second-Empire pedestals from Cordier. 
The busts revel in the period taste for polychromy in sculpture, an international phenomenon sparked by artistic debates about the painting of ancient statuary and inspired by ancient Roman and Renaissance sculpture composed of variously colored marbles. On a trip to Algeria in 1856 Cordier discovered onyx deposits in recently reopened ancient quarries and began to use the stone in busts such as these. He ingeniously fitted enameled bronze heads into the vibrantly patterned stone, creating exciting though costly representations of Africans that appealed to the highest levels of European society. (MET)

MET

fashionsfromhistory:

La Capresses des Colonies

Charles-Henri-Joseph Cordier

1861

In his unpublished memoirs Charles Cordier cites the law of April 27, 1848 that abolished slavery in France and its colonies, writing: “My art incorporated the reality of a whole new subject, the revolt against slavery and the birth of anthropology.” In pioneering ethnography as a subject for sculpture in the nineteenth century, Cordier aimed to illustrate what he described as “the idea of the universality of beauty.” His busts often paired couples of the opposite sex but of the same race. This rare instance of matched busts of women was desired by the purchaser, a gaming club in Marseilles, that also commissioned the sumptuous Second-Empire pedestals from Cordier. 

The busts revel in the period taste for polychromy in sculpture, an international phenomenon sparked by artistic debates about the painting of ancient statuary and inspired by ancient Roman and Renaissance sculpture composed of variously colored marbles. On a trip to Algeria in 1856 Cordier discovered onyx deposits in recently reopened ancient quarries and began to use the stone in busts such as these. He ingeniously fitted enameled bronze heads into the vibrantly patterned stone, creating exciting though costly representations of Africans that appealed to the highest levels of European society. (MET)

MET

(via battlestarvenus)



whimmy-bam:

WHO LET THIS BE A CHILDREN’S SHOW

(via joshpeck)



After all these years …

(via metalbeifongs)